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HOUSE OF HUNGARIAN ART NOUVEAU - BEDÖ HOUSE, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The architect of the Bedö House was Emil VIDOR (1903). The palace (apartment house) of the art collector, Béla BEDÖ is an elegant example of French taste and was built behind surrounding conservative, or Vienna-style buildings. To the varied and lively, playful facade reminiscent of French and Belgian Art Nouveau, Vidor added the well-balances Jugendstil elements of Munich - such as the horizontal stripes on the plaster facade and the ceramic figures on the top of the balconies. The use of split levels is unusual in city buildings and harmonious organisations of the various decorative elements and building materials prove Vidor's unbelievable designing and constructing abilities. The stain-glassed windows of the staircase that have remained intact are especially valuable, as are the protected interior decorations and the sole survivor of the original three wrought-iron shop front. (Source: Budapest Architectural guide - 20th century, 6Bt, 1997)

Its ground-floor is today the home of The House of Hungarian Art Nouveau where a permanent exhibition and a café is to be found.

www.magyarszecessziohaza.hu

© Papp Tímea, KÖH

MUSEUM OF APPLIED ARTS, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The building is a unique masterpiece of Art Nouveau architecture, a prime example of the endeavours of late 19th-century architecture to create a distinctive Hungarian style. The museum, founded by the Hungarian parliament in 1872, was the third museum of applied art in the world. The building, designed by Ödön LECHNER and Gyula PÁRTOS, opened to the public in 1896 as the closing event of the millennium celebrations of Hungarian state foundation. Its solutions clearly reflect Lechner´s effort to create an unmistakably Hungarian style of architecture by incorporating features of Oriental architecture and Hungarian folk arts into the dominant European style.
The magnificent green and yellow ZSOLNAY tiles of its roof and dome make the Museum of Applied Arts a popular and striking landmark on Budapest´s skyline. (Source: Szabó Virág: Szeretettel vár az Iparmüvészeti Múzeum, 2010)

www.imm.hu

© Horváth Edina, KÖH

ÁLDÁS UTCAI PRIMARY SCHOOL, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

Designed by Dezso ZRUMECZKY, the school was built over a two year period (1911-1912).
It was built in the last peaceful years before WWI, and so was the Városmajor Utcai Primary School, designed by Károly KÓS, the leader of this turn of the century movement using folk elements, to which Zrumeczky belonged as well.
Specific attention was paid to the design of certain common spaces and the ergonomics of school equipment and furnishings including the playground, students' desks, retractable chalk boards, and teachers' desks.
The first classes started on September 7, 1912 in 16 classrooms, the facilities included a gymnasium, a staff room, a medical office and dispensary, a three-room nursery, as well as residences for the principal, janitor and nursery attendant.
During WWI it served as a military hospital, and during WWII, bombs destroyed the whole west wing. After extensive internal and external renovations, the building has regained its original character. Modifications included the construction of a stage, an inner load-bearing wall and the replacement of the original wood fence with a metal one.
Modernization efforts in the 1990's included the construction of dining rooms for students and teachers, upgrading the heating systems, electrical wiring and building insulation. The most extensive renovation occurred in 1995 when the lower and upper schools merged. As a result of the expansion, five new classrooms, a library, a weights room, physics and chemistry preparatory rooms and laboratories and studios were added.
We are very fond of our school and guard it zealously, as a safe harbour for those who come here to be guided and enlightened. The quaint architecture that houses the most modern facilities is a reminder of the importance of our heritage as we forge into the future, espousing new ideas, rediscovering traditional ones, while fostering the talents of all who work and play here.

www.aldassuli.gportal.hu

© Hack Róbert, KÖH

GEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The Institute, designed by Ödön LECHNER and built by Sándor HAUSZMANNN, serves the same function since its opening since 1899 - this naturally contributed to the conservation of the original appearance in a relatively intact state. The magnificent roof of ZSOLNAY tiles shining in several shades of blue can be overviewed from the roof terrace of the back annex of the building. One can feel the Oriental atmosphere inside the building: in the foyer, the stairways and the corridors. The way Lechner takes out motives from the small-scale world of embroidery and carving and shapes them into monumental spatial elements while preserving their original character is the culminating point of his brilliant style creation. (Source: Art Nouveau in Hungarian Way, Ödön Lechner, 1845-1914, Kulturális Örökségvédelmi Hivatal, 2004)

www.mafi.hu

© Horváth Edina, KÖH

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