Photo Gallery

GEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The Institute, designed by Ödön LECHNER and built by Sándor HAUSZMANNN, serves the same function since its opening since 1899 - this naturally contributed to the conservation of the original appearance in a relatively intact state. The magnificent roof of ZSOLNAY tiles shining in several shades of blue can be overviewed from the roof terrace of the back annex of the building. One can feel the Oriental atmosphere inside the building: in the foyer, the stairways and the corridors. The way Lechner takes out motives from the small-scale world of embroidery and carving and shapes them into monumental spatial elements while preserving their original character is the culminating point of his brilliant style creation. (Source: Art Nouveau in Hungarian Way, Ödön Lechner, 1845-1914, Kulturális Örökségvédelmi Hivatal, 2004)

www.mafi.hu

© Horváth Edina, KÖH

DUAL LANGUAGE PRIMARY SCHOOL AND CATERING TECHNICAL SCHOOL

The facade of the school designed by Ármin HEGEDÜS in 1906, richly ornamented with undulating ribbons of brick and mosaic friezes guarantees it a place amongst the most beautiful schools of the capital of Hungary. The mosaics, by Zsigmond VAJDA, depict children's game from the turn of the century. The interior layout - including the furnishing - conform to expectations of healthy living habits and contemporary pedagogical principles. The architect saw these elements, and architecture itself, as important components of children's education. (Source: Budapest Architectural guide - 20th century, 6Bt, 1997)

www.dobsuli.hu

© Papp Tímea, KÖH

KINDERGARTEN, ELEMENTARY-, SPECIAL PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL & RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

Sándor BAUMGARTEN, as architect of the Cultural Ministry, designed and built hundreds of school buildings throughout the country. Following his collaboration with Ödön LECHNER, Baumgarten carried out projects in the manner of his master, using sinuous and decorative brick columns and divisions.
Consequently Baumgarten became the most prolific adherent and propagator of Lechner´s architectural style. Among his most significant buildings in Budapest is the School for the Blinds (1899-1904), which represents a transition between Neo-Gothic architecture and Lechner´s style. The interior design, especially the assembly hall and its stained-glass windows which numbers amonst the largest continuous painted glass surfaces in Hungary, are certainly worth a closer look. (Source: Budapest Architectural guide - 20th century, 6Bt, 1997)

www.vakisk.hu

© Papp Tímea, KÖH

MUSEUM OF APPLIED ARTS, BUDAPEST, HUNGARY

The building is a unique masterpiece of Art Nouveau architecture, a prime example of the endeavours of late 19th-century architecture to create a distinctive Hungarian style. The museum, founded by the Hungarian parliament in 1872, was the third museum of applied art in the world. The building, designed by Ödön LECHNER and Gyula PÁRTOS, opened to the public in 1896 as the closing event of the millennium celebrations of Hungarian state foundation. Its solutions clearly reflect Lechner´s effort to create an unmistakably Hungarian style of architecture by incorporating features of Oriental architecture and Hungarian folk arts into the dominant European style.
The magnificent green and yellow ZSOLNAY tiles of its roof and dome make the Museum of Applied Arts a popular and striking landmark on Budapest´s skyline. (Source: Szabó Virág: Szeretettel vár az Iparmüvészeti Múzeum, 2010)

www.imm.hu

© Horváth Edina, KÖH

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